Stove-Pot Moka Pot

The moka pot was patented in Italy by the inventor Luigi De Ponti, for Alfonso Bialetti in 1933. [1] It produces coffee by passing boiling water, that has been pressurised by steam, through a bed of ground coffee. Although patented in 1933 it did not become a popular method of brewing coffee until after World War II when due to its iconic design and the fact that its warmed up quickly it soon became a low-cost and convenient option for the home user. [2]  Because of the high coffee to water ratio and fast brew time this method makes it difficult to make the light roasted, dense and acidic coffees taste good. This method is more suited for a darker espresso roast. [3] Below is a brewing method from The Blending Room.

Equipment

Moka Pot

 Kettle

 Dry cloth

 Cold wet cloth

 Freshly ground coffee

 ​Measuring scales

Method

  • Step 1: Boil water using the kettle and fill the base of the moka pot with the water until it reaches the pressure valve.
  • Step 2: Grind your coffee to a medium/fine consistency. Set the brew basket on the scales and zero. Add the freshly ground coffee to the brew basket taking note of the weight for future reference. Using too fine a grind will give a strong and bitter taste to the coffee.
  • Step 3: Smooth off the coffee grinds so they are flush to the brew basket lip, there is no need to compress it. Compressing it will just increase the risk of over extraction. 
  • Step 4: Making sure the rubber seal is clean, place the brew basket in the bottom section of the moka pot and attach the top section. Do not over tighten and use the dry cloth to avoid burning yourself.
  • Step 5: Place moka pot on to the heat.
  • Step 6: After a short period of time the coffee will begin to appear from the spout and deposit into the top container. As soon as you begin to hear bubbling or gargling noises remove moka pot from the heat and wrap the base in the cold wet cloth.
  • Step 7: Pour the coffee and enjoy.